Radio carbon dating stone tools

Manning, professor of archaeology at Cornell University and director of the Cornell Tree-Ring Laboratory, is the lead author of "Fluctuating Radiocarbon Offsets Observed in the Southern Levant and Implications for Archaeological Chronology Debates," published in the .

However, there is strong evidence which suggests that radioactive decay may have been greatly accelerated in the unobservable past.

Archaeologist Sturt Manning and colleagues have revealed variations in the radiocarbon cycle at certain periods of time, affecting frequently cited standards used in archaeological and historical research relevant to the southern Levant region, which includes Israel, southern Jordan and Egypt.

These variations, or offsets, of up to 20 years in the calibration of precise radiocarbon dating could be related to climatic conditions.

The new isotope is called "radiocarbon" because it is radioactive, though it is not dangerous.

It is naturally unstable and so it will spontaneously decay back into N-14 after a period of time.

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