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However, the ability to post HTML which spurred the sites growth surly played a part in its demise as people began to learn how to break the chat with the same code.The inherent vulnerabilities in allowing users to pass HTML code, caused connectivity issues amongst similar systems and forced owners to choose between continually fixing the breaks, upgrading to a newer technology or giving up altogether.Orkut, with its profile pictures and real names, was considered more trustworthy than the wild wild west of Yahoo! Orkut was better in that respect but it had not been designed from the beginning keeping in mind a commercial strategy, and the cost of re-architecting it was considered too prohibitive. , despite the profusion of profiles with Ayesha Takia pictures. So Google built the Orkut replacement Google , the Rohit Sharma of social networks, supposedly very awesome but no one knows what its good for. Chat and Orkut no doubt, but more than them, for those kinder, simpler times, when corporations did not know what we got off to, when people were users, and not assets that drive stock valuations. Perhaps they suffered from the prison syndrome, where you no longer care if it is a man or a woman. Chat was not just about making connections in the great beyond.Whatever may have been the real reason, the things to remember was that if something was too good to be true, it definitely was. It fuelled the economy, building, together with gaming and porn, the cybercafe business in India.But today it is scattered with posts by people like myself going back to see what’s happened to their favorite chat.

Digichat utilized the latest Java Script technology and offered a fast and sleek, avatar and text based chat room that stood apart from everything other than behemoth companies like AOL which dominated the online market at the time.Those of us who were chatters in the 1990’s might find ourselves looking around our virtual landscape of today, blinking profusely while asking, “What happened to my favorite chat site?” Most of the quaint chat sites we grew up on have vanished.It was organic, it was funny, it was fun, and yes, once in a while, people did find that perfect match. , the company itself began to die under the onslaught of Google. Chat had become like Sealdah station , not maintained, left to rot and with suspicious people hanging about, looking here and there. So they began flocking to the next big thing, social networking. Sure the English was bad, and ppl missed vowels and used caps and small letters indiscriminately, and neologisms like “hottings” and “nottings” (the latter being considered a portmanteau of “naughty things”) were indiscriminately coined, but one could not mistake the genuine bonhomie and desire to connect across boundaries of space and time, and no where was this better expressed than in the albums of pretty women who would wake up in the morning to find scraps left by total strangers of the type “Nice lag. ” But then somewhere down the line, Facebook opened itself to the world, with its better user interface and its locked down albums. It was that its owners never figured out how to commercialize them. Things no longer existed for the sheer pleasure of being there. Yet the two shall remain, in our memories, in hours of lost productivity, in seconds of strategic screen-minimizations,in floating scraps of conversations and in shards of indescribable delight. The age of anonymity and multiple identities had come to an end, to be replaced by a more conventional interaction ethic that more resembled the real world’s. People started fleeing Orkut faster than industries from Bengal, and Orkut, once dutifully maintained and updated, became like a ghost post-apocalyptic cityscape, there and yet not there, Not that Orkut could not have been saved. Power had passed from the hands of engineers and scientists and intellectual adventurers to the MBA types. Chat was too anonymous to monetize through targeted advertisements.

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